Best Shortfilms from Brazil

Best Shortfilms from Brazil




Romance
Brazil | 17min | 2010
This Brazilian LGBT indie short film was released in 2010 and it’s directed by Daniel Ribeiro, who, given its success, would later adapt it into a full-length feature film in 2014, titled The Way He Looks, which was selected as the Brazilian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 87th Academy Awards, but was not nominated. Eu Não Quero Voltar Sozinho (I Don’t Want to Go Back Alone) tells the story of Leonardo, a blind boy that falls in love with his new high school friend, Gabriel. However, things get complicated as he must confront his own just-discovered feelings, and the jealousy of Giovana, his best friend. As they grow closer, the story examines the insecurities of Leonardo and his needed to be loved, even though he doesn’t really know it. How should he express all that’s inside him? Contrary to most coming-of-age films, Leonardo it’s not strictly limited by his elders, but by his inability to find out how to let go his sensitivities towards Gabriel. This path

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Drama
Brazil | 11min | 2007
Just one take, accompanied by two voices, are the elements that build-up director André Novais Oliveira’s short indie film, Fantasmas. Released in 2010, it was his first work (he has now been to Cannes two times already with Pouco Mais de um Mês, in 2011, and Backyard, in 2015, also short films). The minimalist setting in Fantasmas showcases how creatively interesting can become a premise if it’s approached with a sensitive, unconventional eye. It asks a simple question: How do you get over someone? Or, more accurate, do you realize when you can’t do it? Oliveira puts two friends on a balcony and he let’s the viewer hear his voices, but nothing more. The image is static and shows a Brazilian street, by night, unaltered; there’s no formal decisions upon color correction or color psychology, because (as it will be revealed gradually), the film doesn’t need it; its naturalism approach is its biggest weapon. To say more would be to ruin the surprise, as Oliveira’s script is aware of the risks taken, and how they pay-off. Fantasmas was screened in the 3º Hollywood Brazillian Film Festival (EUA, 2011) and the 30º Uppsala Internacional Short Film Festival (Sweden, 2011), between others equally important.

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Drama
Brazil | 19min | 2010
Handebol is, first at all, a gorgeous exercise in style: It has intimidating close-ups, wide-open detailed compositions, hand-held camera when needed, and even some videoclip sequences whit slow-motion. Scriptwriter, director and editor Anita Rocha da Silveira uses all the technical resources at her reach to display the life of Bia, a girl who likes rock, handball… and blood. Instead of focusing on a special narrative complexity or ordeal, da Silveira uses daily life situations to analyze the way each sex deals, mainly in adolescence, with problems and decisions. However, and although it stages certain youth rituals with naturalness, what really makes Handebol stand out is how it incorporates a teenage feeling to the construction of the film. Again, it’s not the story or its plot twist what stands out, but the kinetic energy the camera, the colors, and the music make the viewer feel. Between its principal festivals and prizes, there’s the International Critics' Prize in The International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, 2011, an Honour Mention at the Rencontres Cinemas D'Amérique Latine de Toulouse, 2011, and the Special Jury Prize at the Curta Cinema -- Rio de Janeiro International Short Film Festival, 2010.

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Drama
Brazil | 21min | 2010
Pugile tells the story of two brothers, one of them with Down Syndrome, each one immersed in their own private worlds. They share only the passion for the telecatch show, and nothing more, but both worlds collide after an unexpected family problem. Danilo Solferini crafted a dark tale of mutual incomprehension, avoided responsibilities and dependence, that unfolds naturally through 20-minutes, taking its time to explore the characters sensitivities and motivations, without rushing the situations. It’s a film of details and moments that, under it’s seemingly serious façade, allows the viewer to discover a rich variety of emotions. A curious Easter egg is that the word "pugile" does not exist in Portuguese, but in Italian it means “boxer”; then, what is Solferini trying to say? Pugile works in different ways, and in this lower and subtle layer, the film offers a vigorously take on symbolism. There’s a fine universe of things related to Italy that extends to the fights, even though it’s not intrusive within the main story. It’s up to the viewer to match the dots.

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Romance
Brazil | 4min | 2014
The Conditioned is an indie short film, presented by Facebook Stories, that shows the poor life of Raimundo Arruda Sobrinho, a man known by his locals for sitting in the same spot every day, for more than 35 years. Even though he looks shabby (and maybe a little bit crazy), Raimundo is also a very capable poet, and writes about the things he lives, feels, and thinks. In April 2011, he met Shalla Monteiro, a young woman that was instantly enchanted by his words and, consequentially, decided to help him with his dream of publishing a book. This is their story, and everything that came with it. In little more than four minutes, The Conditioned manages to transform a seemingly dark ordeal into a very humble tale of overcoming, recurring to a candid look, and a straight-to-the-point narrative; it presents the man, and the poet behind him, thanks to his own writings. The film was made combining footage from a documentary based on Raimundo’s life, shot in São Paulo in 2011 and 2012, and interviews filmed in Goîana, Brazil, in January 2014.

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