Best Shortfilms from Mexico

Best Shortfilms from Mexico




Drama
Mexico | 19min | 2011
Against the Sea was released in 2011. Is a co-production between Mexico and U.S.A. directed by student Richard Parkin. Is a little film focused on small people and small actions, but with big emotional resonances; the story unfolds between gorgeous sea shots that reminds of the work of Pedro González-Rubio in Alamar (2009), a Mexican film awarded at the Bafici. Parkin’s film was equally successful than the later, internationally speaking: it won the 2011 Directors Guild of America Student Film Award (Latino/Western Region), and the 2012 Best Student Narrative Film at the RiverRun International Film Festival, between others. It tells the story of Hector, a deep-sea driver that, after a terrible accident, must learn to deal with the dangerous responsibilities of his profession, especially in relationship with his family and what they mean to him. Through a narratively linear structure, the director finds the right balance between character development and spatial awareness, which results in a sweet and complex exploration of marriage life, and the mutual agreements that builds-up trust in hard times. The film was shot on location in the coastal towns of Baja Mexico.

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Romance
Mexico | 13min | 2014
On the surface, Dulce Dolor is about a Piñata that wakes up in the middle of a child’s party and manages to escape her inevitable ending. It might seem like the first minutes of a surreal comedy, but it’s a drama that deals with sadomasochism and its common social perceptions. However, writer and director Moisés Aisemberg embrace a more ambiguous path that leads to self-discovery: It's a movie more about knowing who you really are, and having a healthy relationship with you and others. Because this Piñata, after running away and finding new places and people to meet, realizes that what she really likes is to be beaten. Introducing this concept into the world of relationships, the director is trying to deal with the fact that someone is always going to be hurt, beaten, literaly or metaphoricaly. Then, how to be in peace with it? Dulce Dolor is a technical marvel that reinforce creativity with a strong visual appeal that entertains and, most important, makes the viewer think about its own perceptions of love and relationships.

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Drama
Mexico | 13min | 2014
La Carnada stars with a revelatory epigraph that resumes part of its conceptual importance (its ‘premise’, one might say): “Poor Mexico, so far from God and so close to the United States”. The words belong to former president Porfirio Diaz, and illustrates a recurring theme in Mexican cinematography, always worried (and aware, most of all) of the intricate political and economic climate the country faces. The theme is the lost of culture and identity, and how both are modeled by external factors that deform the original conception of Mexican life. How do normal people confront their personal environments with so much violence and uncertainty around them? Can they live their personal stories without been suck into a world of grief and danger? La Carnada tries to answer this through the vision of a 13-year-old boy from Tijuana, named Manny, involved in a drug smuggle in the Devil's Highway (a part of desert on the Arizona/Mexico border). The film was financed via Kickstarter by 200 people, which helped to achieve the goal set by the filmmaker and his crew. After its release, it would be then nominated to the Best Narrative Short Jury Award at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival.

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